Freddi Williams Evans

Author . Independent Scholar . Arts Educator

Freddi Williams Evans is an author and arts educator.


Bio

Freddi Williams Evans is an arts education consultant and the author of Come Sunday: A Young Reader’s History of Congo Square and Congo Square: African Roots in New Orleans, which received the 2012 Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Book of the Year Award and has been published in French. Her research and advocacy for Congo Square influenced the New Orleans City Council to pass an ordinance in 2012 that made the popular name, “Congo Square,” the official name of the national landmark. Along with numerous essays, her speaking engagements include presentations in France (Paris, Aulnay and Bordeaux) and Senegal (Dakar and St. Louis) sponsored by the American Embassies in those locations.  She participated in Fulbright Teacher Abroad programs in Zimbabwe, South Africa and Japan and additional study-travels in Ghana, Haiti and Cuba.

Evans is an award-winning author of three historically based children's books, Hush Harbor: Praying in Secret, The Battle of New Orleans - the Drummer's Story, and A Bus of Our Own. Her numerous recognitions include, New Orleans Arts Council Community Arts Award and a Mardi Gras Indian Hall of Fame Award. She is a native of Madison, Mississippi and holds dual degrees in music and psychology from Tougaloo Collage, Tougaloo MS and a graduate degree in creative arts therapy (music) from Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, PA.